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Libya's interim government will deploy more than 13,000 troops, along  with aircraft and naval vessels, to ensure security during the the  country's first free national elections since the removal of Muammar  Qaddafi. Officials have set up an operations room to coordinate the troops and  interior ministry forces, plus naval and air elements, ahead of the  July 7 vote, the state-run Libya News Agency reported, citing Youssif  El-Mangoush, the army chief-of-staff. The election will create an assembly to replace the interim  leadership known as the National Transitional Council. The new  legislature will name a new prime minister and appoint a committee to  draft the country's constitution. Qaddafi, who ruled the north African country for 42 years, was ousted  and killed in 2011 at the end of a bloody, eight-month uprising. The country, which sits atop Africa's largest proven crude reserves,  relies almost entirely on oil exports for its revenue. Its ability to  rebuild has been stymied by the central government's failure to rein in  the armed militias that played a key role in ousting Qaddafi. Left, Alwattan Party supporters take part in a rally in Tripoli on July 4.

Libya's interim government will deploy more than 13,000 troops, along with aircraft and naval vessels, to ensure security during the the country's first free national elections since the removal of Muammar Qaddafi. Officials have set up an operations room to coordinate the troops and interior ministry forces, plus naval and air elements, ahead of the July 7 vote, the state-run Libya News Agency reported, citing Youssif El-Mangoush, the army chief-of-staff. The election will create an assembly to replace the interim leadership known as the National Transitional Council. The new legislature will name a new prime minister and appoint a committee to draft the country's constitution. Qaddafi, who ruled the north African country for 42 years, was ousted and killed in 2011 at the end of a bloody, eight-month uprising. The country, which sits atop Africa's largest proven crude reserves, relies almost entirely on oil exports for its revenue. Its ability to rebuild has been stymied by the central government's failure to rein in the armed militias that played a key role in ousting Qaddafi. Left, Alwattan Party supporters take part in a rally in Tripoli on July 4.
July 06, 2012
Article
Libyans Prepare Ahead of General National Congress Election
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